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dc.contributor.authorMohebbi, SR
dc.contributor.authorRostami Nejad, M
dc.contributor.authorTahaei, SME
dc.contributor.authorPourhoseingholi, MA
dc.contributor.authorHabibi, M
dc.contributor.authorAzimzadeh, P
dc.contributor.authorNaghoosi, H
dc.contributor.authorKarayiannis, P
dc.contributor.authorZali, MR
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-26T09:34:33Z
dc.date.available2018-08-26T09:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.tbzmed.ac.ir:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/57754
dc.description.abstractHepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) are enteric hepatotropic viruses and their prevalence is related to the sanitary conditions of the region under investigation. There are only a few studies on the seroepidemiology of these two viruses in the general Iranian population. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the prevalence of hepatitis A and E infections in the general population.Between 2006 and 2007, a cross sectional study was performed in Tehran, Iran. Blood specimens were collected and questionnaires were filled in for 551 persons. Patient sera were tested by ELISA for anti-HEV and anti-HAV IgGs. The ?2 test and independent t-test were used for statistical analysis and p<0.05 was considered significant.The overall seroprevalence rates of anti-HEV IgG and anti-HAV IgG were 9.3% and 90%, respectively. The prevalence of antibodies to HAV and HEV was greater among men than women and increased with age. However, there was no significant relationship between age and gender with the existence of anti- HAV and HEV IgG antibodies.Our results show the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV antibodies are high and both viruses are endemic in this region. These findings are in accordance with results obtained from previous studies. We recommend that foreign travelers to Iran are vaccinated against HAV. © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
dc.subjecthepatitis A antibody
dc.subjecthepatitis E antibody
dc.subjectadolescent
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectage
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectantibody blood level
dc.subjectantibody detection
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectcross-sectional study
dc.subjectenzyme linked immunosorbent assay
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthepatitis A
dc.subjecthepatitis E
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectinfant
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectquestionnaire
dc.subjectschool child
dc.subjectseroepidemiology
dc.subjectsex ratio
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAge Distribution
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHepatitis A
dc.subjectHepatitis Antibodies
dc.subjectHepatitis E
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImmunization Programs
dc.subjectImmunoglobulin G
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPopulation Surveillance
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectSeroepidemiologic Studies
dc.subjectSex Distribution
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectHepatitis A virus
dc.subjectHepatitis E virus
dc.titleSeroepidemiology of hepatitis A and E virus infections in Tehran, Iran: A population based study
dc.typeArticle
dc.citation.volume106
dc.citation.issue9
dc.citation.spage528
dc.citation.epage531
dc.citation.indexScopus
dc.identifier.DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2012.05.013


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