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dc.contributor.authorKheradpezhouh, M
dc.contributor.authorTaremi, M
dc.contributor.authorGachkar, L
dc.contributor.authorAghabozorgi, S
dc.contributor.authorKhoshbaten, M
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-26T09:32:24Z
dc.date.available2018-08-26T09:32:24Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.tbzmed.ac.ir:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/57337
dc.description.abstractBackground and Purpose: Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV), a recently discovered DNA virus, was first identified in patients with non-A to -G hepatitis following blood transfusion. Transmission is generally via the parenteral route but recent data suggest that TTV can also be transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in March 2005 and included 324 patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) at 3 different centers in Tabriz, Iran. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Blood samples for virological and biochemical tests were drawn simultaneously. TTV DNA was detected using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase were also measured. Results: Overall seroprevalence of TTV was 9.3% (95% confidence interval, 6.1-12.5%). Prevalence rates of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C virus antibody, and hepatitis E virus antibody were 4.6% (15/324), 20.4% (66/324), and 7.4% (24/324), respectively. Patients were negative for human immunodeficiency virus antibody. There was no association between TTV infection and elevated ALT levels. TTV-positive patients were significantly younger than TTV-negative patients (p=0.018). There was no significant association between TTV positivity and age, gender, duration of HD, positivity for hepatitis B, C, or E virus infection markers, and history of transfusion and transplantation. Conclusion: We observed low TTV prevalence and no association between TTV and blood-borne infections in our HD patients. TTV infection was not related to elevated levels of liver enzymes; however, the clinical impact of this virus need further investigations. é 2007 Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection.
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
dc.subjectalanine aminotransferase
dc.subjectaspartate aminotransferase
dc.subjecthepatitis B surface antigen
dc.subjecthepatitis c virus antibody
dc.subjectHuman immunodeficiency virus antibody
dc.subjectunclassified drug
dc.subjectvirus antibody
dc.subjectvirus DNA
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectalanine aminotransferase blood level
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectblood transfusion reaction
dc.subjectdemography
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthemodialysis
dc.subjecthepatitis non A to G
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpolymerase chain reaction
dc.subjectTorque teno virus
dc.subjectvirus transmission
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAge Factors
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAlanine Transaminase
dc.subjectAntibodies, Viral
dc.subjectAspartate Aminotransferases
dc.subjectBlood Transfusion
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectDNA Virus Infections
dc.subjectDNA, Viral
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHepatitis B Surface Antigens
dc.subjectHepatitis C Antibodies
dc.subjectHepatitis E virus
dc.subjectHIV Antibodies
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectKidney Transplantation
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPolymerase Chain Reaction
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectRenal Dialysis
dc.subjectSeroepidemiologic Studies
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectTorque teno virus
dc.titlePresence and significance of transfusion-transmitted virus infection in Iranian patients on maintenance hemodialysis
dc.typeArticle
dc.citation.volume40
dc.citation.issue2
dc.citation.spage106
dc.citation.epage111
dc.citation.indexScopus


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